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See what you’re missing with MolecuLight i:X

Introducing MolecuLight i:X

The MolecuLight i:X™ Imaging Device is approved by Health Canada (Medical License #95784) and has CE marking (Certificate #G1160292355002) for sale in the European Union. The MolecuLight i:X™ Imaging Device is not available in the US.



Traditional signs and symptoms of wound infection can often lack sufficient accuracy to guide clinical decisions.1

Leveraging the principle of fluorescence, MolecuLight i:X emits safe violet light which causes bacteria ≥ 104 CFU/g to fluoresce.2

Visualize fluorescent bacteria in real-time

  • Locate potentially harmful levels of fluorescent bacteria instantly2
  • Target wound debridement and cleansing2,3,4
  • Optimize wound-bed preparation prior to advanced treatments5
  • Guide sampling and biopsy2, 6-8
  • Guide wound assessment to assist optimal antibiotic decision making8,9
  • Support more responsible antimicrobial stewardship8,9
  • Support education and patient engagement3,4
  • Bacteria appear red in image. (Pseudomonas aeruginosa would appear cyan if present.)
Flourescent visualisation of bacteria Flourescent visualisation of bacteria
ST-Mode: Venous leg ulcer FL-Mode: Venous leg ulcer


Document wound status

  • Measure wound surface area10,11
  • Capture and save images2,3
  • Track and document progress of wound over time11,2


Wound measurement application

 Watch Moleculight i:X in action 

DFU debridement
The content of the above video is owned by MolecuLight Inc. and is protected under the applicable copyright laws. Smith & Nephew has been provided with the necessary permission to use these videos by the copyright owner. Credit for the video to Rose Raizman EN-EC, MSc, Scarborough & Rouge Hospital, ON, Canada

1. Raizman R. (2016) Point-of-care fluorescence imaging device guides. Proceedings of the 22nd An Can Ass of Wound Care Conf; 2016 Nov 3-6, Niagara Falls, ON.        
2. Rennie (2016) Fluorescence imaging positively predicts. Proceedings of the Annual Wounds UK Conference; Nov 14-16; Harrogate, UK.

 

Lymphedema cleaning
 
The content of the above video is owned by MolecuLight Inc. and is protected under the applicable copyright laws. Smith & Nephew has been provided with the necessary permission to use these videos by the copyright owner. Credit for the video to Rose Raizman EN-EC, MSc, Scarborough & Rouge Hospital, ON, Canada

1. MolecuLight Clinical Case 0045.

 

The MolecuLight i:X is manufactured by MolecuLight Inc.


REFERENCES
1. Hoeflok J et al. Pilot clinical evaluation of surgical site infections with a novel handheld  fluorescence imaging device. Proceedings of the Annual Military Health System Research Symposium (MHSRS); 2014 Aug 18-21; Fort Lauderdale, FL.
2. DaCosta RS et al. Point-of-care autofl uorescence imaging for real-time sampling and treatment guidance of bioburden in chronic wounds: fi rst-in-human results. PLoS One. 2015 Mar 19;10(3).
3. Raizman R. Point-of-care  fluorescence imaging device guides care and patient education in obese patients with surgical site infections. Presented at: CAWC 2016. Proceedings of the Annual Canadian Association of Wound Care Conference (CAWC); 2016 Nov 3-6, Niagara Falls, ON.
4. Raizman R. Fluorescence imaging positively predicts bacterial presence and guides wound cleaning and patient education in a series of pilonidal sinus patients. Proceedings of the Annual Wounds UK Conference; 2016 Nov 14-16; Harrogate, UK.
5. Raizman (2016) Handheld real-time  fluorescence imaging of bacteria guides treatment selection and timing of dressing changes in inpatients undergoing negative pressure wound therapy. Proceedings of the Innovations in Wound Healing Conference; Dec 8-11, Key Largo, FL.
6.Ottolino-Perry K et al. Improved detection of wound bacteria using  uorescence image guided wound sampling in diabetic foot ulcers. Int Wound J. 2017 Feb 28. doi:10.1111/iwj.12717.
7. Rennie MY et al. Clinical evaluation of  fluorescence imaging in positively predicting the presence of bacteria in chronic wounds at the point of care. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Society of Federal Health Professionals (AMSUS); 2016 Nov 29-Dec 2; National Harbor, MD.
8. Hill R and Douglas JJ. Real-time bacterial fluorescence imaging guides antimicrobial stewardship in patients with diverse wounds. Proceedings of the Annual Symposium on Advanced Wound Care (SAWC); 2017 Apr 5-9; San Diego, CA. (Accepted).
9. MolecuLight Inc. MolecuLight i:X User Manual. 2017.
10. MolecuLight Inc. Track wound size and bacterial presence with the MolecuLight i:X [Case study 0051]. 2016.
11 Wu Y C et al. Handheld fluorescence imaging device detects subclinical wound infection in an asymptomatic patient with chronic diabetic foot ulcer: a case report. Int Wound J. 2016 Aug;13(4):449-53.

MolecuLight i:X
in practice

MolecuLight i:X in the chronic wound treatment pathway

Incorporating the MolecuLight i:X into standard care helps clinicians identify  flourescent bacteria and facilitates evidence-based clinician decision making.

  Inform wound assessment
Visualise fluorescent bacteria and measure wound surface area in real-time to understand the status of the wound more fully.1-3
 

Improves patient education, engagement
and adherence
Patients easily see and understand why a clinican is taking certain action to clean, debride and treat a wound in a specific way.4,5

Inform documentation
Provides objective visual documentation of the presence of fluorescent bacteria and the surface area of the wound.2,9

Inform antibiotic decision making
Supports more responsible antibiotic decision making and selection.6,8.9

   

Inform cleaning
Allows clinicians to focus cleaning in areas where fluorescent bacteria are located and optimize wound bed preparation.10

 

Inform sampling
Guides where to sample. 54% more accurate swabbing compared to the Levine Technique.3

 

Inform debridement
Guides more efficient and targeted debridement.2,6,7

 

Inform treatment choice
Comparing the visualization of bacteria between patient visits will provide real-time, objective feedback on whether bacteria is responding to therapy for informed treatment selection.1,2,4

 

 

Download the MolecuLight i:X case study booklet 
REFERENCES
1. Wu YC, Smith M, Chu A, Lindvere-Teene L, Starr D, Tapang K, Wong O, Linden R, DaCosta RS. Handheld fluorescence imaging device detects subclinical wound infection in an asymptomatic patient with chronic
diabetic foot ulcer: a case report. Int Wound J. 2016 Aug;13(4):449-53.
2. DaCosta RS, Kulbatski I, Lindvere-Teene L, Starr D, Blackmore K, Silver JI, Opoku J, Wu YC, Medeiros PJ, Xu W, et al. Point-of-care auto fluorescence imaging for real-time sampling and treatment guidance of bioburden in chronic wounds:  rst-in-human results. PLoS One. 2015 Mar 19;10(3).
3. Ottolino-Perry K, Chamma E, Blackmore K, Lindvere-Teene L, Starr D, Tapang K, Rosen C, Pitcher B, Panzarella T, Linden R, DaCosta RS. Improved detection of wound bacteria using fluorescence image-guided wound sampling in diabetic foot ulcers. Int Wound J. 2017 Feb 28. doi: 10.1111/iwj.12717. [Epub ahead of print].
4. Raizman R. Point-of-care  uorescence imaging device guides care and patient education in obese patients with surgical site infections. Presented at: CAWC 2016. Proceedings of the 22nd Annual Canadian Association of Wound Care Conference; 2016 Nov 3-6, Niagara Falls, ON.
5. Raizman R. Fluorescence imaging positively predicts bacterial presence and guides wound cleaning and patient education in a series of pilonidal sinus patients. Proceedings of the Annual Wounds UK Conference; 2016 Nov 14-16; Harrogate, UK.
6. Landis SJ. Mapping venous ulcers using bacterial auto fluorescence (BAF) to identify subgroups at risk of infection post debridement. Proceedings of the Annual Canadian Association of Wound Care Conference; 2016 Nov 3-6, Niagara Falls, ON.
7. Hoe ok J, Teene L, Chamma E, Chu A, DaCosta RS. Pilot clinical evaluation of surgical site infections with a novel handheld fluorescence imaging device. Proceedings of the Annual Military Health System Research Symposium (MHSRS); 2014 Aug 18-21; Fort Lauderdale, FL.
8. Hill R and Douglas JJ. Real-time bacterial fluorescence imaging guides antimicrobial stewardship in patients with diverse wounds. Proceedings of the Annual Symposium on Advanced Wound Care (SAWC); 2017 Apr 5-9; San Diego, CA. (accepted).
9. MolecuLight Inc. Case Study 0051 Track Wound Size and Bacterial Presence with the MolecuLight i:X. 2016.
10. Raizman R (2016) Handheld real-time fluorescence imaging of bacteria guides treatment selection and timing of dressing changes in inpatients undergoing negative pressure wound therapy. Proceedings of the Innovations in Wound Healing Conference; Dec 8-11, Key Largo, FL. 

Evidence and testimonials

It’s vital that health care providers seek more efficient ways of managing resource intensive patients with wounds.1

The MolecuLight i:XTM Wound Intelligence Device offers maximum insights to facilitate evidence-based clinician decision making.2

Up to 9x faster healing

Incorporating the MolecuLight i:X wound assesment tool into standard care helps clinicians identify and treat fluorescent bacteria which has been shown to reduce the average closure time of chronic wounds from 200 to 22 days (up to 9x improvement over standard care).3

89% overall reduction in costs compared to the standard of care4

Integrating the MolecuLight i:X into routine wound care  facilitates evidence-based clinician decision making and has been shown to reduce the cost of treating chronic wounds by 89% (compared to the standard of care). This has been shown to lead to:

More positive outcomes: Accelerates wound closure time which could lead to reduced visits3  
More effective sampling: Visualises the location and distribution of bacterial load across the wound bed and periphery resulting in 54% more accurate swabbing4
More savings: Facilitates more responsible decision making on dressings, antimicrobials and antibiotics at the point of care5,6
Less ineffective wound treatments: Instead, informed dressing selection and objective feedback to track efficacy1,6
Less unnecessary drug use: Instead, optimizes therapies and supports responsible antimicrobial stewardship5,6

May accelerate wound closure3

Accurate wound assessment leads to more appropriate wound treatment which may accelerate wound closure.

MolecuLight i:X guided treatment increased the rate of wound healing (statistically significant) compared with the standard of care.3

  Wound closure time graph

 Testimonials

“This wound would never have healed so quickly without the MolecuLight i:X and the gained insight to debride more frequently.”
Dr Stephan Landis, MD, FRCP(C) Guelph General Hospital, Guelph, Canada

“The MolecuLight i:X images show no red fluorescence on the gauze or wound and clinical signs and symptoms suggest nice wound healing. I will discontinue use of antimicrobial ointment and dressings and continue negative pressure wound therapy with regular gauze.”
Rose Raizman, RN-EC, MSc, Scarborough & Rouge Hospital, Toronto, Canada

“I would not have suspected high levels of Pseudomonas on this wound. Both the Infectious Disease physician and myself were surprised when seeing the MolecuLight i:X images, which influenced my dressing selection.”
Rosemary Hill, BSN, CWOCN, CETN(C) Vancouver Coastal Health, North Vancouver, Canada

REFERENCES
1. Lindholm C and Searle R. Wound management for the 21st century: combining effectiveness and effi ciency. Int Wound J. 2016 Jul;13 Suppl 2:5-15.
2. Wu YC et al. Handheld fl uorescence imaging device detects subclinical wound infection in an asymptomatic patient with chronic diabetic foot ulcer: a case report. Int Wound J. 2016 Aug;13(4):449-53.
3. DaCosta RS et al. Point-of-care autofl uorescence imaging for real-time sampling and treatment guidance of bioburden in chronic wounds: fi rst-in-human results. PLoS One. 2015 Mar 19;10(3).
4. Ottolino-Perry K et al. Improved detection of wound bacteria using fl uorescence image guided wound sampling in diabetic foot ulcers. Int Wound J. 2017 Feb 28. doi: 10.1111/iwj.12717.
5. Hill R and Douglas JJ. Real-time bacterial fluorescence imaging guides antimicrobial stewardship in patients with diverse wounds. Proceedings of the Annual Symposium on Advanced Wound Care (SAWC); 2017 Apr 5-9; San Diego, CA. (Accepted).
6. Landis SL et al. Use of fluorescence imaging in visualizing bacteria in chronic ulcers and traumatic soft tissue damage. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Society of Federal Health Professionals (AMSUS); 2016 Nov 29-Dec 2; National Harbor, MD.

More about MolecuLight i:X

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The MolecuLight i:X is manufactured by MolecuLight Inc.

Download the MolecuLight i:X user manual

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is manufactured by
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